Since the start, the SCF has been working alongside a number of organizations and individuals to grow the capacity of our programs and strive for excellence in newcomer support. From connecting English tutor mentors with newcomer mentees, launching a Women’s Wellness Program, co-organizing our social dinners, and much more. The extent and strength of our programs would not be as far reaching without these collaborations. We are grateful for each of our partners for their continuous support and commitment in making a positive difference in the lives of newcomer communities across the GTA and Canada!

Our Partners

Refugee Career Jumpstart Project

The Refugee Career Jumpstart Project (RCJP) is a Canadian non-profit focused on streamlining the process between the arrival of Syrian refugees and their employment. Since 2015, the RCJP has referred 144 individuals to opportunities.

The Al-Qazzaz Foundation for Education and Development (QED)

QED builds, connects, and empowers individuals and communities to foster equity of access and outcome. This is done through innovative education and development projects, rooted in the values of human rights, democracy and social justice.

University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM)

Established in 1967, the University of Toronto Mississauga is the second-largest campus of U of T (Canada’s largest university). Through their Helping Hands club supports the Syrian Refugee Pathways program and English tutoring program.

COSTI Immigrant Services

COSTI is a community-based multicultural agency providing employment, educational, settlement, and social services to all immigrant communities, new Canadians and individuals in need of assistance.

Purpose

Purpose builds and supports movements to advance the fight for an open, just, and habitable world. They create campaigning labs and new initiatives that can shift policies and change public narratives when it matters most.

UNICEF

For 70 years, across 190 countries and territories, UNICEF defends the rights of every child globally. In all of its work, UNICEF takes a life-cycle based approach, recognizing the particular importance of early childhood development and adolescence.